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Mary L. Dudziak

books and selected works
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War Time
Exporting American Dreams
Cold War Civil Rights
September 11 in History
Legal Borderlands
Articles and Essays

Mary L. Dudziakis Director of the Project on War and Security in Law, Culture and Society, and the Asa Griggs Candler Professor (designate) at Emory University School of Law.   Her research focuses on the impact of war on American democracy and on the relationship between international affairs and American legal history. She has written extensively about the impact of foreign affairs on civil rights policy during the Cold War and other topics in 20th-century U.S. legal history. . Her newest book is War Time:  An Idea, Its History, Its Consequences (Oxford University Press, 2012).  She is also the author of Exporting American Dreams:  Thurgood Marshall's African Journey (Oxford University Press, 2008), Cold War Civil Rights:  Race and the Image of American Democracy (Princeton University Press, 2000; 2nd ed. 2011), and other works.  Her work has been supported by fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, and Membership in the School of Social Science, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton. Dudziak moved to Emory in July 2012 from the University of Southern California Law School, where she was the Judge Edward J. and Ruey L. Guirado Professor of Law, History and Political Science. 
 
More about the Author
Emory Web Page (forthcoming)
USC Web Page
                                                                                                                                                                                                      
                                                                              

About the Books:


War Time:  An Idea, Its History, Its Consequences (Oxford University Press, 2012)

"Mary Dudziak's new book, War Time: An Idea, Its History, Its Consequences, is a crucial document. Her smooth foray into legal and political history reveals that in not just the past decade but the past century, wartime has become a more or less permanent feature of the American experience, though we fail to recognize it . . . Dudziak assembles an intellectual Rubik's Cube, playing with ideas of time, law, killing and politics, and arranging them into a pattern that all but eliminates the distinctions we long assumed to have existed between war and peace." --The Nation


"Closely argued and clearly written, this is a scholarly work with popular appeal." -- Publisher's Weekly


Download the Introduction here.

 

Exporting American Dreams:  Thurgood Marshall's African Journey

"In this gem of a book, Mary Dudziak brings vividly to life the important but little known history of Thurgood Marshall's intense involvement with Kenya during its journey toward independence in the 1960s....A powerful and poignant story, beautifully told." -- Gary Gerstle, Vanderbilt University

 

Cold War Civil Rights:  Race and the Image of American Democracy        

"Impressively researched and vividly written. . . . Convincingly demonstrates how Cold War pressures both empowered and constrained the civil rights movement's quest to build a more just America."  Rogers M. Smith author of Civic Ideals: Conflicting Visions of Citizenship in U.S. History

 

"Groundbreaking."--American Lawyer

 

"Dudziak's book will inspire a reconsideration of postwar civil rights history."--Alex Lubin, American Quarterly   

       

September 11 in History                          

"I am exhilarated by the collective wisdom, creativity, and insight of this unusual yet riveting distillation of perspectives on September 11."—Bruce Lawrence, author of Shattering the Myth: Islam beyond Violence

 

Legal Borderlands:  Law and the Construction of American Borders

"By weaving together colorful and contentious strands of culture, history and law, these essays make a compelling argument that "it is in its bleeding borders that law itself, and with it American identity, is constructed, contested, and made meaningful." Harvard Law Review